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  • Welcome

    We are excited to present our new responsive website to Rhode Island. Here you will find information on various topics related to domestic violence and the work we are doing to end it. The site is designed to provide resources to individuals experiencing abuse so that they can get the help they need. It is also a valuable tool for people who want to help and for those who want to get involved. Check back often for updates, and share your feedback with us so that we can better serve you.

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  • Latino Outreach

    Oprima el botón “Read More” para acceder a nuestro sitio web en Español.

    At the RICADV, we proactively serve the Latino community, collaborating with Rhode Island businesses to further our reach to those experiencing abuse. During our public awareness campaigns, we have partnered with Telemundo, Providence en Español, and Latina 100.3 FM to help Latino communities know that help is available through our member agencies. Each agency offers diverse programs and services that can include safety planning, court advocacy, shelter, and support groups. Immigration help is also available. Access our website in Spanish by clicking the "Read More" button below or En Español at the top of this page.

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  • Member Agencies

    The RICADV's six local domestic violence agencies provide a wide array of services for victims, including 24-hour hotline support, emergency shelter, support groups, counseling services, and assistance with the legal system. For more information about these organizations and services, call the statewide Helpline at 800-494-8100 or click below. If you see or hear someone being hurt, call 911 immediately.

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  • Communities Can Help

    Last October, we launched our KNOW MORE. DO MORE. campaign in recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM). Our goal was to help different sectors of the community – including health care, the workplace, faith, and Latino communities – take action to end domestic violence. When communities take a stand as leaders on this issue, individuals are more likely to have the support they need to act. That's when we'll see real change in Rhode Island. That's how we'll put a stop to domestic violence. Learn more about our 2014 campaign by clicking below.

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  • We Give Support.

    As coworkers, employers, businesses and organizations, we have the ability to help those experiencing domestic violence. The workplace often serves as a location where abusers can readily access their victims, and relationship abuse can greatly impact victims' job performance in other ways, too; for instance, victims lose an estimated 8 million days of paid work each year due to domestic violence, the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs. These problems only serve to exacerbate the financial abuse that occurs in 98% of abusive relationships. An easy way to begin creating a safe workplace environment is to display materials on domestic violence in visible, accessible areas. Click below to view DVAM 2014 posters that you can hang in your office.

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  • We Listen.

    Health care providers are often the first to learn about the domestic violence that their patients may be experiencing and are in a unique position to help prevent future abuse. Listening to patients is a critical first step. During DVAM 2014, the RICADV connected with members of Rhode Island's health care community to help them know more about the steps they can take to address domestic violence. We partnered with the Rhode Island Medical Society, which published an article written by RICADV staff in the October issue of Rhode Island Medical Journal. View the article by clicking below.

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The Newsroom

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Latest News

Domestic Violence is Deadly to Rhode Island's Future

At a hearing today for the Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence's 2015 top legislative priority, the Domestic Violence Prevention Fund (H5651), state lawmakers will hear testimony on the high cost of domestic violence to Rhode Island businesses, cities and towns, and to every citizen and community throughout Rhode Island. The bill is sponsored by Representative Christopher R. Blazejewski, and a companion bill (S650) will be introduced this afternoon in the Senate by Senate Majority Whip Maryellen Goodwin.

Domestic violence is a serious, widespread and preventable public health problem that affects individuals, communities, the workforce, and society. It is similar to other workplace health and safety issues that gravely impact businesses, their bottom lines, and the lives of their employees.

In order to build a bright future for Rhode Island, everyone must take action to prevent domestic violence in Rhode Island communities.

Read More: Latest News

The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence Utilizes Digital Tools to Reach Teens During Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month

NEWS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Tuesday, February 19, 2013
CONTACT: Cristina Williams at RICADV: (401) 467-9940; Cell: (917) 940-3729

Local organization partners with statewide advocacy and prevention groups and receives national support for innovative mediums to reach youth

[Providence, R.I.] The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence (RICADV) continued its innovative approach to reaching teens Friday during the #NOMORERI Tweet Chat, "How Jealous is Too Jealous?" The second online conversation, held on Twitter and Facebook, was designed to reach youth where they spend a majority of their free time—online, particularly using social networking outlets.

"We know that violent behavior is often learned at an early age [between the ages of 12-18], even before it begins to appear in dating relationships. We also know that teens and young adults utilize technology and media devices to engage with one another, but one consequence of that regular use is that digital abuse is rampant among them. For these reasons, technology can be an excellent tool in reaching them," said Deborah DeBare, executive director of the RICADV, "and we are dedicated to ending dating violence and teaching them about healthy relationships."

A 2009 study by eMarketer estimated that 72 percent of teens rated themselves a light, average or heavy user of social networking outlets. More than 90 percent of teens go online and, more and more of them are flocking to websites such as Twitter.

 

With this in mind, the #NOMORERI Tweet Chat Series was created to teach youth about healthy relationships and engage them in real, honest dialogue about dating violence. Each chat is led by a dating violence survivor from the RICADV task force Sisters Overcoming Abusive Relationships (SOAR); still, after the first chat it was clear that the series was also making a deeper impact on a group that is normally exposed to these stories.

"Thank you everyone for hearing & sharing. Your support made sharing my story for the 1st time very empowering!" posted "Emily" the survivor who led the first chat on February 8 from the SOAR in RI account, and under a pseudonym to make sharing more comfortable.

The fact that so many teens are online is one reason why digital abuse in relationships is on the rise. Some dangerous online behaviors include monitoring partners, checking their messages, bombarding them with messages and requesting inappropriate photos. And overall, one in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner. Girls and women between the ages of 16 and 24 experience the highest rates of intimate partner violence and very often, parents are unaware of the abuse. What's worse is that teen girls face relationship violence three times more than adult women, and this experience often continues the cycle of abuse as they get older.

Clearly, there is a conversation that needs to happen, and RICADV has taken it to social media to do just that.

The launch of the #NOMORERI Tweet Chat Series, "Loves Me, Loves Me Not," was made successful in part because of the support from local and national advocacy and prevention groups, including the national NO MORE group. NO MORE is a groundbreaking symbol designed to galvanize change and radically increase the awareness of domestic violence and sexual assault in our communities. It also unites organizations that are working to end domestic violence and advocating for the rights of victims. The RICADV's NO MORE RI campaign was developed as an extension of the national effort during the Domestic Violence Awareness campaign in October 2012 and has been the foundation for the Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month campaign.

In addition to the #NOMORERI Tweet Chat Series, the RICADV, along with its member agencies/partners for TDVAPM (Blackstone Valley Advocacy Center, Domestic Violence Resource Center of South County, Elizabeth Buffum Chace Center, Sojourner House, Women's Center of RI, Women's Resource Center of Newport, Sisters Overcoming Abusive Relationships [SOAR], Lindsay Ann Burke Memorial Fund, Katie Brown Educational Program and Day One) have planned several other ways to reach and engage with teens and college students (listed below).

RICADV and its TDVAPM committee also launched the month with a partnership with Jasmine Villegas ("Jasmine V"), who was chosen to be the spokesperson of the NO MORE RI campaign in February. She is a rising recording artist, social media maven and dating violence survivor who passionately speaks about her experience in the hopes of empowering others to do the same and end teen dating violence. The TDVAPM PSA featuring Jasmine is currently airing in RI. More information about Jasmine can be found on www.NOMORERI.org.

Another vital partner in both the prevention and education of dating violence, the Johnson & Wales Gender Equity Center, hosted the February 15 #NOMORERI Tweet Chat. This partnership models work that is critical to stemming the epidemic and mirrors areas being considered in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, which the Senate voted to reauthorize this week as S.47. The new language includes provisions to help eliminate domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking on college campuses.

Korina Ramsland, director of the Johnson & Wales Gender Equity Center, said of the partnership, "We are happy to lead the trend of the community supporting the RICADV. Dating and domestic violence are global issues. It's not just about one entity—we must stand together. [Our youth] deserve safe and healthy relationships and to be educated so they can also provide leadership to their communities in supporting healthy relationships."

Ramsland also said more than a third of her college population are teens and violence is not behavior the university tolerates. They are committed to helping those going through dating violence situations and are focused on prevention efforts through working with their teens on outreach activities and community service projects.

"We are thrilled to participate in the Tweet Chat Series because technology is often misused and to use it in a healthy way that is positive, is a huge piece of the solution. If we're having to write laws about cyberstalking and bullying, we need to offset that with something truly good and full of hope," she added.

AND the RICADV agrees: violence against young women, and women in general, is a critical epidemic that needs to be addressed both in RI and globally. Here in RI, other activities/efforts planned for TDVAPM include:

State House Lighting: The State House will be lit teal from February 15-22 in recognition of Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month (TDVAPM). The new color is symbolic of the national NO MORE campaign to end dating and domestic violence in Rhode Island.

#NOMORERI Tweet Chat on Feb. 22 "Breaking the Cycle" from 2-4 p.m.: The final conversation in the #NOMORERI Tweet Chat Series will focus on breaking the cycle of abuse and will be led by a dating violence survivor like the first two.

Digital Dating Violence Training for Teens on Feb. 27 from 1-3 p.m.: The RICADV and Sojourner House will offer a special training, "Innovative Ways to Work with Youth on Teen Dating Violence Prevention in the Digital Era." The training will show how technology and the Internet can be used to teach the difference between healthy and unhealthy relationships and offer strategies. Registration/more info is available at www.ricadv.org.

Real Talk Cards: This tool was created for parents and adults that work with young people to start a dialogue about healthy relationships with the youth in their lives. They are pocket-sized for ease of use and they will also be available online at www.NOMORERI.org.

For additional information about the RICADV and NO MORE campaign to end dating violence, please visit www.NOMORERI.org or call (401) 467-9940. And, if you need help, call the 24-hour hotline at 1-800-494-8100.

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Communications Center

  • Communicating our work to end DV is vital +

    Communicating the work to end domestic violence is vital. Visit our Communications Center and The Newsroom to KNOW MORE. Read More
  • Public Awareness +

    Raising awareness to end domestic violence is part of our mission. Learn how we keep the issue visible in our communities. Read More
  • Handbook for Journalists +

    The media can help break the silence and educate the public. Visit our online guide for journalists covering domestic violence.
    Read More
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Site Search

Teen Center

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KNOW MORE: Relationship abuse happens among teens, too. Visit our Teen Center during the launch of Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month in February 2015 for interactive tools!

Spotlight

  • Be Tech Safe
  • News & Events
  • 35 Years of Progress
  • AmazonSmile

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Your abuser may monitor your Internet use and may be able to view your computer activity.

To immediately leave our site and redirect to a different site, click on the box to the bottom-right of our website or hit the ESC (Escape) key on the upper-left of your keyboard.

If you feel that your computer is not secure, use a computer in another location that your abuser cannot access.

For more information and tips for staying safe online and on your devices, click "Read More" to visit the Privacy & Technology section of our website.

Read More

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Looking to get involved in the movement to end domestic violence
or just want to KNOW MORE?

Visit our Calendar of Events to find a myriad of local and
social media events.

Read More

spotlight image lisaleslie35th Anniversary Celebration

In 2014, the RICADV celebrated 35 years of progress in advocating for victims and holding abusers accountable.

On October 9, during Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we commemorated this milestone with special guest Lisa Leslie, WNBA legend, four-time Olympic gold medalist, and supporter of the national NO MORE campaign against domestic violence.

We thank everyone who has played a part in helping us move our work forward. Together we can end domestic violence.

Visit our 35th anniversary page to watch a special video, view photos of the event (coming soon!), and more.

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AmazonSmile-webWhat is AmazonSmile?

AmazonSmile is a simple and automatic way for you to support the RICADV every time you shop, at no cost to you. When you shop at http://smile.amazon.com, you'll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to the RICADV.

On your first visit to AmazonSmile, you need to select a charitable organization to receive donations from eligible purchases before you begin shopping. Choose the RI Coalition Against Domestic Violence to support us. Amazon will remember your selection, and then every eligible purchase you make on AmazonSmile will result in a donation.

About the RICADV

The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence (RICADV) is an organization dedicated to ending domestic violence. We were formed in 1979 to support and assist the six domestic violence prevention agencies in Rhode Island. We provide leadership to our member agencies, strive to create justice for victims, and raise awareness on the issue of domestic violence in Rhode Island.

Member Agencies

The RICADV's six local domestic violence agencies provide a wide array of services for victims, including 24-hour hotline support, emergency shelter, support groups, counseling services, and assistance with the legal system. For more information about these organizations and services, call the statewide Helpline at 800-494-8100 or click here. If you hear or see someone being hurt, call 911 immediately.

 

Contact Details

422 Post Road, Suite 102
Warwick, RI 02888-1539

T (401) 467-9940

F (401) 467-9943