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Nationwide Survey Reveals Urgent Need for Increased Funding for Domestic Violence Service Providers Across All States, Including Rhode Island

Nearly 66,000 Domestic Violence Victims Helped On a Single Day, But Almost 10,000 Requests for Help Go Unanswered

[Providence, RI - March 6, 2014] Today, the National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) released a new research report that found, in a single 24-hour period, more than 66,000 victims of domestic violence received help and support from service organizations in the United States, yet nearly 10,000 more who needed assistance could not be helped due to a lack of adequate resources.

The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence is a member of the NNEDV. In Rhode Island, 284 victims received services in that 24-hour period, but 223 could not be helped because local programs here in Rhode Island didn't have sufficient resources.

More than 64,000 Victims of Domestic Violence Served in just One Day

More than 64,000 Victims of Domestic Violence Served in just One Day

Over 10,000 requests went unmet in that same day due to lack of funds

For Immediate Release - March 25, 2013 - In just one 24-hour period, local domestic violence programs across the country provided help and safety to 64,324 adults and children who were victims of domestic violence. Survivors were given a safe place to stay and resources to escape violence and abuse. Sadly, 10,471 times on that same day, a hotline rang or a victim showed up at the door to request a shelter bed, an attorney, counseling, or another critical service and the local program was forced to say "I am so terribly sorry that we don't have the resources or funds- can I work with you on a safety plan or try to find you some help in a neighboring town?"

For the seventh consecutive year, the National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) conducted its annual National Census of Domestic Violence Services on September 12, 2012 and today released their analysis of that data in the report: Domestic Violence Counts: A 24-hour Census of Domestic Violence Shelters and Services. The report revealed that reduced funding for domestic violence services means that programs are unable to help survivors with shelter, attain legal help, or leave abusive partners.

The economic conditions of the past few years have had a significant impact on domestic violence programs. "Cutting funds to domestic violence programs means that victims have fewer places to turn," said Kim Gandy, President and CEO of NNEDV. "It is impossible to hold offenders accountable and provide safe havens for victims with reduced funding for services and shelters. Budget cuts at the local, state, and federal level are creating increased danger to victims and their children."

Additionally, the pending funding cuts resulting from the sequester also worry victim advocates. According to recent analysis, sequestration will result in approximately 70,000 fewer victims getting help from domestic violence programs and approximately 36,000 fewer victims having access to protection orders, crisis intervention and counseling, sexual assault services, hospital-based advocacy, transitional housing services, and help with civil legal matters.

As programs are cutting staff, reducing hours, and cutting back on services due to lack of funds, the true harm is to domestic violence victims. "Across the country, domestic violence programs are working harder than ever to help victims of abuse," added Gandy. "But we also know that, across the board, funding for victim services is dwindling while the demand is climbing."

Funding to underwrite some of the costs of administering the survey was generously provided by the Avon Foundation for Women and printing was provided by the Allstate Foundation. "This highly regarded report provides a snapshot of the life-saving services being provided to victims of domestic violence every day," said Carol Kurzig, President of the Avon Foundation for Women. "We are honored to partner with NNEDV to help them shine a light on the great work happening, as well the many unmet needsin every community across the nation."

On September 12, 2012, 1,646 out of 1,924, or 86%, of identified local domestic violence programs in the United States and territories participated in the 2012 National Census of Domestic Violence Services. The figures represent the information reported by the 1,646 participating programs about services provided during the 24-hour survey period. In addition to the number of victims served, more than 20,000 hotline calls were answered and more than 25,000 individuals were educated on domestic violence across the country on the survey day.

The full report will be available online at www.nnedv.org/census. State level statistics are in the back of the full report and state summaries will be posted www.nnedv.org/census.

 

Please click here for the Rhode Island specific results:

 

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Special Thanks go to the 56 state and territorial coalitions who help coordinate this ambitous survey, to the 1,646 local programs who do life saving work and shared a glimpse of it with us, and to the tireless and passionate team at NNEDV who made this survey and report possible. 

About NNEDV

The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV),a 501(c)(3) social change organization, is dedicated to creating a social, political and economic environment in which domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking no longer exist. As the leading voice for domestic violence victims and their allies, NNEDV members include all 56 of the state and territorial coalitions against domestic violence, including over 2,000 local programs. NNEDV has been a premiere national organization advancing the movement against domestic violence for almost 25 years, having led efforts among domestic violence advocates and survivors in urging Congress to pass the landmark Violence Against Women Act of 1994. To learn more about NNEDV, please visit www.nnedv.org.

Contact: Cindy Southworth, NNEDV communications@nnedv.org or 202-543-5566 ext 113

 

President Obama signs Violence Against Women Act Reauthorization

President Obama to Sign VAWA Reauthorization

Advocates, survivors celebrate improved law's passage

March 6, 2013 - Tomorrow, President Obama will sign the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (VAWA) of 2013 into law. The highly anticipated signing secures needed protections and services for victims of domestic and sexual violence.

"We are honored to be part of this long-awaited event, as President Obama stands with victims of violence and signs VAWA's reauthorization into law today," said Kim Gandy, President and CEO of the National Network to End Domestic Violence. "We know that Vice President Biden, who authored the original VAWA as a U.S. Senator, will share in our delight as this legislation is signed into law. He has worked tirelessly to ensure that the final bill was bipartisan and victim-centered."

VAWA 2013 is a strong reauthorization that includes landmark protections for women on Tribal lands, improves protections for immigrant victims, ensures services for LGBT survivors, and adds important housing protections for victims. The bill also preserves and maintains core funding for life-saving victim services.

"This law will substantially improve access to justice and services for ALL victims" said Gandy.

VAWA's movement from a bill to a law is the result of a collaborative effort between survivors, advocates and Congressional champions. In 2010, thousands of advocates joined calls to begin discussing how VAWA could be improved to better meet the needs of victims across the nation. In the years since, national organizations, state coalitions, local service programs, and victims and advocates across the country have spoken out, working in partnership with each other and with Congress to help push VAWA toward passage.

"We know that this bill could not have reached the President's desk without the outstanding commitment of dedicated advocates and Congressional champions. In particular, we acknowledge the steadfast leadership of the bill's original sponsor Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and its co-sponsor Senator Mike Crapo (R-ID), and leaders in the U.S. House of Representatives including Representatives Gwen Moore (D-WI), John Conyers (D-MI), Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), and the many others in Congress who stood together for a final bill that truly reaches all victims."

With the significant and much-needed changes and improvements included in this reauthorization, the law will require coordinated implementation and funding to ensure that it reaches its potential.

"We look forward to working with partners across the nation to turn the letter of VAWA law into avenues for safety and justice for all survivors," concluded Gandy.

NNEDV Praises House Passage of VAWA

Violence Against Women Act Update: February 28, 2013

This is a historic moment in the movement to protect all women from violence in the United States. The RICADV applauds the leadership and early support of our Senators Reed and Whitehouse in helping to pass – at both the Senate and House - this strong version of VAWA that offers better protection to a wider population. We also thank our allies for supporting our local and national advocacy efforts around VAWA. We now excitedly wait for the signing of VAWA by President Obama, who has said he would sign it if passed.


NNEDV Praises House Passage of VAWA

Looks Forward to President Obama Signing Bill into Law

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives took up the Senate-passed bill to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), and passed this vital legislation by a bipartisan vote of vote of 286-138, including 87 Republicans voting in favor. NNEDV applauds the Members of Congress who led the fight and voted for VAWA's passage.

"Victims of violence and their advocates are breathing a collective sigh of relief today, knowing that this critical bill is on its way to President Obama for signature. We commend those who stood in support of victims and put the needs of those suffering from abuse ahead of partisan politics," said Kim Gandy, President and CEO of NNEDV. "These Representatives, and the Senators who voted in favor of the bipartisan VAWA, have renewed our nation's commitment to protecting victims of domestic and sexual violence."

The legislation that passed today is a strong reauthorization that includes landmark protections for women on Tribal lands, improves protections for immigrant victims, ensures services for LGBT survivors, and adds important housing protections for victims. The bill also preserves and maintains core funding for life-saving victim services.

NNEDV was founded to help pass the original Violence Against Women Act in 1994 and NNEDV is honored to have been part of this next step forward.

"Advocates and survivors have been working on this bill for years and will be elated to watch the President sign it into law," concluded Gandy.

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VAWA Update - February 12, 2013

VAWA Update - February 12, 2013


The RICADV Thanks Senators Reed and Whitehouse for Their Part in VAWA's Senate Victory


Statement from the President on the Senate Passage of the Violence Against Women Act

Today the Senate passed a strong bipartisan bill to reauthorize and strengthen the Violence Against Women Act. This important step shows what we can do when we come together across party lines to take up a just cause. The bill passed by the Senate will help reduce homicides that occur from domestic violence, improve the criminal justice response to rape and sexual assault, address the high rates of dating violence experienced by young women, and provide justice to the most vulnerable among us. I want to thank Senator Leahy and his colleagues from both sides of the aisle for the leadership they have shown on behalf of victims of abuse. It's now time for the House to follow suit and send this bill to my desk so that I can sign it into law.


NNEDV Celebrates Senate Passage of VAWA

Calls for Swift House Passage

February 13, 2013 -- Today, the U.S. Senate resoundingly passed S. 47, a bipartisan bill to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) by 78-22. The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) applauds the Senators who voted for VAWA's passage.

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